Rice

Rice

Description :

Since a large portion of maize crops are grown for purposes other than human consumption, rice is the most important grain with regards to human nutrition and caloric intake, providing more than one fifth of the calories consumed worldwide by the human species.

The seeds of the rice plant are first milled using a rice huller to remove the chaff (the outer husks of the grain). At this point in the process, the product is called brown rice. The milling may be continued, removing the 'bran', i.e., the rest of the husk and the germ, thereby creating white rice. White rice, which keeps longer, lacks some important nutrients; in a limited diet which does not supplement the rice, brown rice helps to prevent the disease beriberi.

There are many varieties of rice; for many purposes the main distinction is between long- and medium-grain rice. The grains of long-grain rice tend to remain intact after cooking; medium-grain rice becomes stickier. Uncooked, polished, white long-grain rice grains. Rice is cooked by boiling or steaming, and absorbs water during cooking. It can be cooked in just as much water as it absorbs, or in a large quantity of water which is drained before serving. Electric rice cookers, popular in Asia and Latin America, simplify the process of cooking rice. Rice is often heated in oil before boiling, or oil is added to the water; this is thought to make the cooked rice less sticky.